ABC Splash

What is ABC Splash?

splash.abc.net.au
ABC Splash brings you the best Australian content from across ABC TV and Radio plus high-quality video from around the world.

  • a new world-class education website for Australia
  • packed with hundreds of videos, audio clips and games
  • watch and play at home and in school

See volcanos erupt and microbats fly. Investigate fossils, megafires and worm farms. Meet fairytale monsters. Unwrap an Ancient Egyptian mummy and explore the Great Barrier Reef without getting wet!

Awesome adventures in your classroom and your family room

There are special areas for parents and teachers featuring thought-provoking articles and blog posts, teaching resources and up-to-date education news.

Here you will find hundreds of new videos and special features. You’ll be able to make and mash up your own Collections in the cloud, save your favourites and upload your own videos, songs and pictures.

Watch, listen, play and make

The ABC has teamed up with Education Services Australia to link hundreds of new learning resources directly to the Australian Curriculum. Look out for cutting-edge games, virtual worlds and immersive digital experiences.

To learn more about ABC Splash, sign up to our Newsletter from the homepage.

If you or your institution would like to speak with us about a collaboration with ABC Splash, please contact the ABC Splash team.

ABC Splash Live – a suite of live events for Australian schools

ABC Splash is continuing to roll out a comprehensive series of high-quality live events across Australia, for teachers and students. Schools across the country are invited to engage with these events using Live Streaming from our website.

Stay in touch via FacebookTwitter to receive advanced notice of the event schedule, so your school can become involved.

So far, ABC Splash Live has run a series of live webcasts on Space, Vikings, Conflict Reporting and Dinosaurs which you can watch on demand from the Events page, where you can also take part in upcoming events. Follow ABC Splash events on social media using hashtag #ABCSplashLive

ESA update

New things from ESA to support Australian schools implementing the Australian Curriculum,  as of March 2013.

New Content:

  • Large number of contributed resources that will be available via Scootle and jurisdicitonal portals
  • Partner projects – ESA works with many partners to make content available. The list of recent partners contributing content is here.  Additionally there are self-hosted projects like ABC Splash, ABC Splash Live. There may be content held in our own jurisdiction that could be added to the national collection. – think about that possibility.

New Services:

Simpler  Scootle account registration for teachers

www.teachingacenglish.edu.au and several other sites that are being developed with other partners to support teaching the Australian Curriculum

Teacher Ideas Exchange – a new project to enable self-sustaining networks for teachers. Target is the Australian Curriculum, but in reality ANY topic could be a network – eg Using Origami in Year 2

QR codes and education

A Livebinder collection of ideas about QR codes in education.
http://livebinders.com/play/play_or_edit?id=51894

I had a conversation with a person early this year about using QR codes to
tag interesting parts of a foreshore walk near Montrose – not sure if she
proceeded but it would have been a good student project.

I only recently realised that the URL shortener bit.ly also produces QR
codes – just stick .qr on the end of the short url that bit.ly produces.
eg http://bit.ly/pdWITA.qr

An unusual use of QR codes is on headstones – these link visitors to a
website about the deceased.

See http://www.monuments.com/livingheadstone or
http://www.bitrebels.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Interactive-Headstone-QR-Codes-1.jpg

And inevitably – the QR tattoo
http://www.barcodeart.com/store/wearable/qr_button/index.html . Perhaps it links to http://www.george-orwell.org/1984

Reconsidering ICT in schools – what we should and shouldn’t provide

Rethinking school responsibilities

This post will become an extension of a paper I started to write in around October 2009 for ACEC2010. The paper was never completed as my employer generously funded me to attend ACEC, and some of the ideas in the paper were reasonably radical and in conflict with most conventional thinking in education jurisdictions. As this paper did not reflect the views of the organisation I represented at ACEC I did not feel it would be appropriate to present it, as it may have been misinterpreted as the views of my employer.

However since ACEC2010 the issues in the paper have become more important and have benn discussed in numerous professional communities. I have thus begun re-framing the paper in a way that aligns with the major issues facing ICT in education.

The paper represents my views, not those of my employer or the various organisations I represent.

Content will be added as it is edited.

Questions can be directed to me by email. You’ll find it if you look…

The production line model

100 years after Ford’s Model T production line success, the US is subsidising the scrapping of old cars. Schools based on the same model are still with us – is it the right approach for the times? Tom March points out that wikipedia fulfils most of the ideal school criteria – respect, willingness to adapt, value colleagues, trust etc..

Does a crowd-sourced approach work better for education than a production line model?

Can schools learn from Wikipedias success? Or, WHAT can we learn?

Rosny College March 30 2009

Some resources you may find useful, depending on what you want to do.

Note that if you are looking at spending serious time on image or video tasks for professional purposes, you probably need to look at professional-grade software and also gain some professional skills in image design or film-making. These tools are aimed at the sort of things students and teachers typically do as part of another subject area.

SumoPaint http://www.sumopaint.com/app/ – a very nice Web2.0 tool, very similar to Photoshop. It’s free and as its entirely online you don’t need to install anything on your computer. You can set up an “account” if you want to save things online, or just save to your computer. Has inbuilt help at http://www.sumopaint.com/help/

Irfanview http://www.irfanview.com/ – Free simple image editor – needs to be installed but should be available to all students as a simple resize/resample/convert type tool.

Image Resizer PowerToy http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/Downloads/powertoys/Xppowertoys.mspxresize one or many image files with a right-click – avoids the inevitable “5Megabyte image in a Word document” problem ….

Microsoft MovieMaker free download at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/updates/moviemaker2.mspx , help at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/moviemaker/default.mspx

How-tos at http://www.ecentre.education.tas.gov.au/C5/Movie%20Maker/default.aspx (need DoE username and pwd offsite)

Simple video editing based on the standard timeline model

Audacity http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ – free audio editing tool, has to be installed. Also need to download the LAME MP3 encoder if you want to export to MP3